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Author Topic: Coptic Pronunciation as given by Sir G. Willinkson  (Read 4698 times)

06 July , 2009, 05:16:25 pm
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Coptic Pronunciation as given by Sir G. Willinkson
« on: 06 July , 2009, 05:16:25 pm »
I've found this text in a book called
A Compendious Grammar of the Egyptian Language as Contained in the Coptic, Sahidic, and ... (1863)
can be found here http://www.archive.org/details/acompendiousgra00tattgoog

09 November , 2009, 07:24:52 am
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Offline Krammy

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Re: Coptic Pronunciation as given by Sir G. Willinkson
« Reply #1 on: 09 November , 2009, 07:24:52 am »
Don't you just love it when Anglo-Saxon authors label the hieroglyphs equivalent to the Arabic letters Ha and Ayin (  حand  ع) as "h" and "a" ?

09 November , 2009, 08:49:24 pm
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Re: Coptic Pronunciation as given by Sir G. Willinkson
« Reply #2 on: 09 November , 2009, 08:49:24 pm »
why would I love that?

09 November , 2009, 10:06:33 pm
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Offline Krammy

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Re: Coptic Pronunciation as given by Sir G. Willinkson
« Reply #3 on: 09 November , 2009, 10:06:33 pm »
I was being sarcastic. I meant to say that I think it is annoying when authors try to represent the phonology (the pronunciation/the sounds) of a foreign language by using sounds of their own that are not like the ones in the language. Doing this is very misleading.

10 November , 2009, 02:08:44 pm
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Re: Coptic Pronunciation as given by Sir G. Willinkson
« Reply #4 on: 10 November , 2009, 02:08:44 pm »
they don't, they use h with (.) under it to represent ح
and they use half circle to represent ع
of course in Coptic both letters are rare anyway, but in hieroglyphics they represent those letters correctly

14 January , 2015, 03:45:47 pm
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Offline Anaksunamun

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Re: Coptic Pronunciation as given by Sir G. Willinkson
« Reply #5 on: 14 January , 2015, 03:45:47 pm »
I was being sarcastic. I meant to say that I think it is annoying when authors try to represent the phonology (the pronunciation/the sounds) of a foreign language by using sounds of their own that are not like the ones in the language. Doing this is very misleading.

It is only usually used to help assist those who are not familiar with the possible pronunciation.
Ancient Egyptian possibly did not have the ayin or aleph sounds, instead through history they merged into different sounds as is evident in Coptic. But I totally understand where you are coming from, since I also speak Spanish and when I read the grammars and pronunciation I also tell people that some of the letters are not pronounced the way they show it in the books, and usually it's more than one letter and it causes people to mispronounce words and doesn't sound natural.

17 September , 2017, 01:18:58 am
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Offline bashandy

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Re: Coptic Pronunciation as given by Sir G. Willinkson
« Reply #6 on: 17 September , 2017, 01:18:58 am »
It's an interesting document. The resemblance to Old Bohairic pronunciation is remarkable. I think pronunciation has always been a spectrum. Where Old bohairic is a spectrum that varies from person to person but it retains a certain frame.