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Author Topic: Old / Arabicized versus the New / Grecized pronounciation of Bohairic  (Read 16852 times)

29 August , 2009, 03:47:11 am
Reply #15

Offline Andrew

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Re: Old / Arabicized versus the New / Grecized pronounciation of Bohairic
« Reply #15 on: 29 August , 2009, 03:47:11 am »
Thank you for the recording of the Lord’s Prayer.  Singing it to tune helps in memorization.

As you mentioned, William H. Worrell’s “Coptic sounds” is out of print.  When I have time, I may be able to borrow it through an inter-library loan. 

But Amazon does carry Thomas O. Lambdin’s “Introduction to Sahidic Coptic” that seems to be a major text for teaching Coptic in academic institutions.  I intend to buy that book.

God bless you,

Andrew   

30 August , 2009, 01:15:13 pm
Reply #16

Offline Admin

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Re: Old / Arabicized versus the New / Grecized pronounciation of Bohairic
« Reply #16 on: 30 August , 2009, 01:15:13 pm »
You might also want to consider this book Coptic in 20 lessons

02 September , 2009, 03:31:00 am
Reply #17

Offline Andrew

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Re: Old / Arabicized versus the New / Grecized pronounciation of Bohairic
« Reply #17 on: 02 September , 2009, 03:31:00 am »
Thank you very much for the recommendation.

God bless you,

Andrew

22 November , 2009, 03:15:37 pm
Reply #18

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Re: Old / Arabicized versus the New / Grecized pronounciation of Bohairic
« Reply #18 on: 22 November , 2009, 03:15:37 pm »
the following is from wikipedia
Quote
Koine Greek arose as a common dialect within the armies of Alexander the Great. Under the leadership of Macedon who colonized the known world, their newly formed common dialect was spoken from Egypt to the fringes of India
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koine_Greek
Koine Greek is the one that the Egyptians learned and its pronunciation is the pronunciation the Egyptians used
Koine Greek was replaced by Medieval Greek, since the foundation of Constantinople by Constantine I in 330 A.D
at that time Coptic language was already standardized and used to write many Coptic text
maybe Greece changed its pronunciation after that date (330) but the Egyptians did not follow

22 November , 2009, 03:47:43 pm
Reply #19

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Re: Old / Arabicized versus the New / Grecized pronounciation of Bohairic
« Reply #19 on: 22 November , 2009, 03:47:43 pm »
actually our pronunciation was very similar to "Historic Attic Pronunciation" (is it the same?)
http://biblicalgreek.org/links/pronunciation.php#Conventions

22 November , 2009, 06:43:33 pm
Reply #20

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Re: Old / Arabicized versus the New / Grecized pronounciation of Bohairic
« Reply #20 on: 22 November , 2009, 06:43:33 pm »
That explains a lot, thanks
I just want to add something about Beta, that's it wasn't always W in all dialects
In Bohairic it was "B" or "ou" (and it exchange with ⲟⲩ in many words)
however in Sahidic it was "B" or "F" (and it exchanges with ϥ [fai] in many words)
considering the fact that the uneducated Egyptians still pronounce the V as F (in English words)
and also considering the fact that "B" can be pronounced "W" if you didn't completely close your lips
then I think you are right, maybe Greek pronounced it V but Egyptians pronounced it as F or W (since V never existed in our language)