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Author Topic: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays  (Read 4035 times)

29 December , 2011, 05:16:24 am
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Offline AlexderFranke

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I am very interested in the topic of maintaining and reviving minorised languages. As the Coptic Christians occurred again in the media in recent times, my view goes again to the Coptic language.

I have read of revivalist attempts in the church by the mid of the 19th century. I wonder why on earth they did not succeed to revive Coptic as well as everyday language. This time was more favorable than our days as there were far less radical Muslims and Panarabists. If a few persons use it as everyday language, the radical Muslims and Panarabists certainly do not mind about it. However, I believe that it is possible that they could start actions against it if it would appear in Egypt as a widespread movement among Coptic Christians.

At any rate, Coptic courses ought to consider everyday use as well and not treat it as dead language. In my point of view, it is important for revivals to teach the language to children and encourage them to use it in everyday life.

Some people say that reviving languages that fell out of everyday use would be artificial. Well, in the case of languages that are totally out of use since long like Ugaritic or Sumerian, I would agree. In the case of Coptic, this would make sense as it has not totally fallen out of presence in church. Furthermore, the Coptic identity still exists with its link to the language even if it is only for liturgical purposes. Some texts left are not from a period that far back. And linguistic heritage is best saved by using languages in everyday life and teaching it as native language to children.

Alex
« Last Edit: 29 December , 2011, 03:33:33 pm by AlexderFranke »

01 January , 2012, 01:45:25 pm
Reply #1

Offline abo_dokhana

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Re: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays
« Reply #1 on: 01 January , 2012, 01:45:25 pm »
it all about politics , other than Coptic
church cares about gaining power so, let Coptic language go to hell
coptic cares about their rights none cares about its identities

briefly you may say coptic langauge died out and so the Copts
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02 January , 2012, 04:50:34 am
Reply #2

Offline batroc

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Re: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays
« Reply #2 on: 02 January , 2012, 04:50:34 am »
it all about politics , other than Coptic
church cares about gaining power so, let Coptic language go to hell
coptic cares about their rights none cares about its identities

briefly you may say coptic langauge died out and so the Copts


]ekklycia `cmosi cavahou `mpilaoc piry] `ete pilaoc swpi `mmof ec`eswpi `nqytf on `nje ]ekklycia

03 January , 2012, 11:14:38 am
Reply #3

Offline Admin

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Re: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays
« Reply #3 on: 03 January , 2012, 11:14:38 am »
the attempt of reviving the language in the 19th, failed because insstead of reviving the language the church invented a new pronunciation of the language making the language the church reviving look like a western language.
I really hope we could revive the language as it was

10 January , 2012, 07:12:23 am
Reply #4

Offline AlexderFranke

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Re: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays
« Reply #4 on: 10 January , 2012, 07:12:23 am »
Well, I have read about the changes the Church has made take place in the 19th century for political reasons. At any rate no change that makes sense!

If Coptic is forgotten, the Christian faith, the name "Coptic Church" and the Alexandrine rite will remain. But a language is an important identity marker and link to heritage.  The nearly total loss of the Coptic language beside the Muslim faith among Muslims is an important reason that citizens of the state of Egypt are often called Egyptian Arabs today.

Of course, human rights of Coptic Christians are a great cause for concern and sorrow which causes me to ask where is God. This however is no reason to forget the care about identity. The Coptic Church is the only imagineable force to save a world heritage linked to Ancient Egypt and the coptic language. Human rights for Coptic Christians in the end are also relevant  for saving this heritage. By the way: Pre-Arabic heritage is very much linked to church in Mesopotamia, too.

Alex

10 January , 2012, 11:10:18 am
Reply #5

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Re: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays
« Reply #5 on: 10 January , 2012, 11:10:18 am »
there is attempts to teach / revive the orginal pronunciation, but most people give up quickly (or even slowly) when they feel its not used by church or anywhere else

11 January , 2012, 09:49:15 pm
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Offline AlexderFranke

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Re: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays
« Reply #6 on: 11 January , 2012, 09:49:15 pm »
Well, Copts beginning to take up Coptic in everyday life are free to do so in true Bohairic and to foster others to do the same. The professor Kamal Farid Ishac has written an overview of Coptic sayings in everyday life, yet, on the web.

As a teacher of Coptic, one can teach both Greco-Bohairic and true Bohairic and tell those in the lessons the background of this matter. The teacher is free to foster them to bring the talk onto true Bohairic in their parishes. They are also free to work out some everyday settings as well.

Alex

11 January , 2012, 09:59:58 pm
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Re: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays
« Reply #7 on: 11 January , 2012, 09:59:58 pm »
Many people tried to learn both Greco-Bohairic and true Bohairic,
but that made them not accurate at pronouncing any of them
I am not saying my opinion here, I am saying what I practically experienced with both seniors and new comers

11 January , 2012, 11:19:58 pm
Reply #8

Offline AlexderFranke

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Re: Revivalist attempts in the mid of the 19th century and nowadays
« Reply #8 on: 11 January , 2012, 11:19:58 pm »
Those who begin to talk Coptic in everyday life should do so in true Bohairic. When they read out or sing something at church, it is not that bad if they do it not rightly at 100% as Greco-Bohairic itself is not the true Bohairic. Otherwise, those folks could ask if they are allowed to read out how they are talking to XY in true Bohairic. In choir, of course, everybody must sing the same sounds.

Alex
« Last Edit: 11 January , 2012, 11:22:33 pm by AlexderFranke »